High School Reunion Ideas – 10 Steps to a Fun and Memorable Event

Planning a high school reunion? Here are some reunion ideas to help you plan the perfect get together, whether you’re setting up one night of fun or a whole week’s full of adventures.

Class reunions are really exciting events. You get to meet up with classmates that you may not have seen for years as a lot of them have moved away from the old neighborhood to different cities, counties or states. Some of them may have even moved out of the country since graduating.

Maybe you’ve lost touch with a lot of your old classmates, even if it’s only been ten years since graduation. A lot of alumni may only see their old classmates at a class reunion so planning one that makes sure these alumni will keep coming back takes some good advanced planning.

So where do you start? Well, here are some planning ideas to help, starting with how to find all of those former classmates now that you’ve been out of touch for a while.

  1. Find some former classmates to help with planning a class reunion. Planning takes a lot of work but it doesn’t have to be stressful, especially if you can locate and “hire” some assistance from your old pals. And with today’s technology, not only can you find a lot of your old classmates through social networking sites like Facebook, MySpace and Classmates.com for example. And with the help of Facebook and free websites, you can even do a lot of the planning online as well. Once you find a few enthusiastic classmates with some good reunion ideas, start assigning out tasks such as…
    • finding those elusive classmates and getting email and physical addresses for invitations.
    • having someone look for a venue that’s large enough so you don’t have to worry about the size of the guest list later on.
    • planning a format for entertainment like music, games, etc.
    • making name tags for your classmates. This may come in handy if people have changed as they’ve aged.
    • planning a menu, keeping in mind that you may need a really wide variety to accommodate different diets like gluten free or diabetic. You want everyone to have some nice choices for their meals.
    • high school reunion ideas for decorations. This can be in the form of banners, posters, streamers, balloons, table decorations, etc. You might even decide to center it around a theme like the year you graduated high school.
  2. Location! Location! Location! Choosing where to have your reunion is extremely important for a couple of reasons:
    • Your former classmates may have to travel quite a distance to attend so you want a place that’s close to hotel accommodations for your long-distance buddies.
    • Size matters when it comes to planning a high school reunion location, especially if you had a large graduating class and you manage to get most of them to attend. And if they bring their spouse, significant other, partner or what have you, that’s twice the size of your class so you need to make sure the room or space is large enough to comfortably accommodate the amount people you expect to attend.
    • Price plays a role in the venue you choose. You don’t want to price anyone out of attending so your high school reunion ideas for choosing a location should definitely include price shopping for the best value. For example, if you find a hotel with a nice large room that’s often used for wedding receptions, maybe they’ll give you a discount if you book it early or give bulk discounts if X amount of guests book a room for the night at the same time.
  3. Plan months – if not years – ahead. You think you need to give plenty of notice to wedding guests? The exact “rules” apply for a high school class reunion. So one of the high school reunion ideas is to make sure you set the date out far enough for long distance classmates to plan their schedules accordingly. Some may have to take vacation time, hire sitters, board pets and save money to make the trip. High school reunion invitations should be fun and – well – inviting. Add a list of all of the classmates you’re inviting and if you have their permission, include their emails too. Add a list of alumni you haven’t been able to locate through normal channels and ask the invitees to get back to you if they know where any of the missing can be found.
  4. Use social networking sites like Facebook Groups to help give your classmates a head’s up about the upcoming reunion and to help locate your long lost high school pals. You can even set up a free website or forum to get the ball rolling plus ask for more high school reunion ideas from future attendees.
  5. Ask for donations. High school reunion planning can turn out to be pretty expensive, probably almost as much as a wedding reception when you really think about it. But don’t be nervous about asking your former classmates for a little monetary assistance to get done what needs to be done to make the reunion successful. One of the most helpful high school reunion ideas to help defray upfront costs is to make sure the reunion is “by invitation only” and sell the tickets well ahead of time. These funds can be used to pay for decorations, caterers, venue deposits, entertainment and favors or gift bags for the guests.
  6. Hire a photographer. You’ll want lots of pictures of your old classmates and even a new class portrait to commemorate this event. To cut costs here, check with your high school or community college to see if any of the students in photography classes would like to make some money. You’ll get really good photos and help another student in the process.
  7. Roll out the red carpet. Just like celebrity entrances, have your guests enter on a red carpet with the photographer taking their picture as they enter.
  8. Play music from your year of graduation. You can do this a couple of ways. When you check your high school or community college for photographers, ask around for music students or groups of students who have a band who’d be interested in playing at the reunion. Another option, if you have a local School of Rock, these kids would love the opportunity to show off their talents at an event like a high school class reunion. My nephew attends the School of Rock in Exton, PA and we’ve been to several of their “garage band concerts” and these kids have talent!
  9. Make up name tags for your former classmates. This will come in handy for those people who really look nothing like they did in high school.
  10. Gift bags or swag bags for favors. High school reunion ideas call for getting creative and nostalgic while being practical and fun at the same time. Like with any party favors, you can put together edible favors, useful favors, funny or gag favors or things that remind you of the year you graduated.

Custom laminated bookmarks make great favors because you can create them with different quotes on each one. Your classmates can share and swap them for their favorite quotes and photos. You can find quotes for your bookmarks just about anywhere and some suggestions are song lyrics from the top songs during the high school era and quotes from the backs of the yearbooks. Add magnets to the backs of the bookmarks. Magnets are always useful and fun favors for any party. In fact, you can use even us laminated bookmarks to mail out Save the Date notices to your classmates letting them know to “bookmark the date” on their calendars and watch for the invitations to come in the mail.

Hopefully these high school reunion ideas will help you with planning a high school reunion that all your classmates will love and look forward to for years to come.

10 Questions for Online High Schools

So you have decided to earn a high school diploma online. Good for you! However, choosing the right online high school is paramount in your being a successful student. Choose wrong and you may not graduate. Choose well and you are on your way.

Below are ten questions that should be used as a jumping-off point in your school selection process.

  1. Do you have a high school diploma track? Yes, there are schools that only provide courses, but do not offer the complete package. You will want to know which this particular school is.
  2. What is the size of the student population? It can be large and it can be small, but you will want to know how many students. Why? Because you will also want to know how many teachers. Then do a division problem. Does each teacher have hundreds of students assigned? This could be a warning sign.
  3. How long have you been an online school? While new schools can be innovative, there is much to be said for schools that have stood the test of time. In the online school world, that may be a school that has been offering courses for at least three years.
  4. How many courses/credits do I need in order to graduate? Best to know this up-front. The number of courses likely mirrors the number required at traditional public schools. Could be a little less, but shouldn’t be more.
  5. How liberal is your credit transfer policy? If you have already been attending high school, you will want the school to accept all or almost all of your high school credits. If a school says that they don’t accept transfer credits or will only accept a very few, you will want to consider whether this is the right school for you. It may still be a good choice in other areas, but you will want to know the answer to this question before you enroll.
  6. Do many of your students get accepted into four-year colleges? This may not be a goal of yours right now, but you could change your mind. Understanding now where a school’s graduates end up can be helpful. Some online schools will post a list of the colleges being attended by its graduates. This is helpful to you.
  7. Do most students pass their courses? It would be nice if they would be willing to let you know their percentage of course completions. The number should be neither too high or too low.
  8. Will I be assigned to a teacher? Some online schools run more on auto-pilot than others. Do you want a teacher to support you? Choose a school where there is much teacher-student interaction. Do you not want a teacher? Choose a school where you are more on your own.
  9. How will I work with other students? Some schools factor in group work. Others don’t. Decide which you like and choose based partly on this factor.
  10. What is your refund policy? If the school is not tuition-free, it’s never a bad idea to know how you can get your money back if you change your mind.

These questions at least get you started down this path. It is likely that these ten lead to ten more. That’s fine; effective research is key in making your selection.

Impact Of Good Early Childhood Education On A Child

Today when the subject of early childhood education is discussed our thoughts go to grade school youngsters or children in kindergarten. However, the focus of early childhood education indeed considers all children from birth to the age of 5 years old. This is part of our government’s findings about the impact of good early childhood education.

The Human Services and the Dept. Of Education are working in line to ensure the child care education programs across the US have a strong strategy for the education and care of our preschoolers. An announcement from the National Academy of Sciences publications says that early childhood education and care taking for our preschoolers needs to work together when meeting early requirements of children across the US. The program for preschoolers are being designed with both these components in mind for childcare education.

A change will be happening as the first graders will be groomed in cognitive and social readiness when they enter the first grade of school. This move is prompted by calls to the White House to act upon some research studies done that indicate the positive impact of Head start programs and other childcare education studies. Program evaluations found early child care and education made an impression upon the cognitive skills, health and behavior status of children through graduation.

The Head start programs and plans which sent nurses into homes of mothers and their infants, as well State Pre-K programs, delivered early childhood education information to parents about their physical and emotional health. Statistical evidence provided information that children safety issues improved. Reports of parents served in these programs for early childhood education were positive for the entire family unit.

The same children who started out in early childhood education programs decades ago were tracked and the results show reductions in criminal behavior resulted. There are also indications that the dropout rate was decreased because issues that began for children were addressed before they ever entered the first grade. Researchers in kindergarten and preschool education discovered that those who drop out of school must be attended to before their third grade class in school.

The reports of positive results in lowering dropout rates and criminal behavior came from improved behavior and better IQ’s achieved in kindergarten education programs. These reports, after the program evaluations, were the reason people called the White House for continued funding to support early childhood education for all children from birth to kindergarten.

In conclusion, the program evaluations of early childhood education determined the long term results were an investment. Every dollar spent on these programs produced a return worth seven times the investment. Costs to care for the jailed dropouts arrested for criminal behavior and the indigent adults without education; they bear upon society’s purse strings to further fund welfare and prison systems. Both the people and the government are in favor of preventative efforts established by the kindergarten programs.

Why More and More States Are Starting to Pay Greater Attention to Early Childhood Education Programs

Just a few years back, very few state education departments in the USA showed any willingness to devote their attention and resources to early childhood education programs. In those days, most of the attention would be focused on elementary, secondary and college education programs, leaving the early childhood system largely uncared for. The reasoning behind this was quite simple: that early childhood education didn’t matter, and that resources would be better spent if devoted to the higher education systems (where output is usually more tangible and hence more quantifiable).

Fast forward to today, and we see more and states devoting considerable resources and attention to the early childhood education system. There are a number of ways through which this is manifesting. We are, for instance, seeing more and more childhood education centers being built in low income areas, to encourage parents who wouldn’t otherwise put their children through ECD to do so. Many state governments are also employing more and more early child educators. And supervision for early child educators, even those not in the government payroll, is being tightened, to ensure that it is a quality education they are giving kids. In many states, we are increasingly seeing people aspiring to become early child educators being put through licensing processes. And more often than not, one of the conditions for licensure is that the person must have a good understanding of early education techniques – with quite a good number requiring aspiring ECD teachers to have degrees in the discipline.
So, the question that comes up is as to why more and more governments are paying closer attention to early childhood education.

And while several factors can be seen as being the trend where more and more state governments are paying closer attention to early education, it turns out that their efforts in that regard are mostly being informed by findings from education research. Those are findings to the effect that the quality of childhood education a person gets is one of the key determinants of that person’s educational achievement over a lifetime. This is where it emerges that people who receive good quality early education tend to go on to become educational achievers, with people who receive poor quality early childhood education (or no ECD at all) going on to become non-achievers education-wise, regardless of their natural abilities. The mechanism via which this trend manifests, it seems, is via the fact that it is in the ECD system that ‘attitudes to learning’ are developed. It follows, then, that good ECD would develop good attitudes to learning in learners, whereas poor ECD makes them averse to learning.

Governments are increasingly becoming awake to the fact that although the results of early education may not be directly quantifiable, childhood education still has a very huge impact on the rest of the education system over the years. Thus, they become aware to the fact that devotion of resources and attention into the early childhood is, in fact, an investment into future success for the (whole) education system. Conversely, it is now widely understood that neglecting childhood education would do the whole education system a lot of harm in the longer run. That would be happening as students with poor attitudes to learning (thanks to poor early childhood education) go through the system, and probably come out of it without attaining their fullest potential.